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Une Prison dans la ville

Une Prison dans la ville

Author: Michel Fize
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 376
Year: 1983

Une prison dans la ville... histoire de la "prison-modèle" de la santé

Une prison dans la ville... histoire de la "prison-modèle" de la santé

Author: Michel Fize
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 188
Year: 1983

Une prison dans la ville ...: 2ème époque : 1914-1983

Une prison dans la ville ...: 2ème époque : 1914-1983

Author: Michel Fize
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1983

Prisons of Poverty

Prisons of Poverty

Author: Loïc J. D. Wacquant
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816639000
Pages: 217
Year: 2009
In this title, the author examines how penal policies emanating from the United States have spread thoughout the world. The author argues that the policies have their roots in a network of Reagan-era conservative think tanks, which used them as weapons in their crusade to dismantle the welfare state and, in effect, criminalise poverty.
History of Andersonville Prison

History of Andersonville Prison

Author: Ovid L. Futch
Publisher:
ISBN: 0813036917
Pages: 146
Year: 2011
Andersonville Prison was troubled by squalor, mismanagement, and waste. Looking for reasons for the conditions at the prison, Ovid Futch cuts through the controversy surrounding the prison and examines diaries and first-hand accounts of prisoners, guards, and officers, and both Confederate and Federal government records.
Andersonville

Andersonville

Author: MacKinlay Kantor
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 767
Year: 1966

Eileen

Eileen

Author: Ottessa Moshfegh
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143128752
Pages: 272
Year: 2016
"A lonely young woman working in a boys prison outside Boston in the early 60s is pulled into a very strange crime, in a mordant, harrowing story of obsession and suspense."--Provided by publisher.
Zebratown

Zebratown

Author: Greg Donaldson
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439159076
Pages: 288
Year: 2010-08-24
Eight years in the making, this edgy, in-depth account follows a black felon’s attempt to find a new life for himself with a white woman in a small-town neighborhood where—as the book’s title implies—such relationships are common. A remarkably intense read, Zebratown reveals a rhythm of life spiked with violence, betrayal, sex, and the emotional dangers created by passionate love. Greg Donaldson’s Zebratown follows the life of Kevin Davis, an ex-con from Brownsville, Brooklyn, who, after his release from prison, moves to Elmira, New York, and takes up with Karen, a young woman with a six-year-old daughter. Kevin is seemingly the embodiment of hip-hop gangsterism—a heavily muscled, feared thug who has beaten a murder rap. And yet, as Donaldson’s stunning reportage reveals, Kevin has survived on the streets and in prison with a sharp intelligence and a rigid code of practical morality and physical fitness while yearning to make a better life for himself and be a better man. Month by month and year by year, Donaldson follows Kevin and Karen’s attempt to make a home together, a quest made harder by Kevin’s difficulty finding legal employment. The dangerous lures of the street remain for him, both in New York City and in Zebratown, and he is not always successful at avoiding them. Meanwhile, as Kevin and Karen struggle, the reader comes to care for them, even as they act in ways that society may not condone. Theirs is a complex story with many moments of drama, suffering, desire, and revelation—a story that is frequently astonishing and unforgettable to the end. Like Adrian Nicole LeBlanc in Random Family, Donaldson explores a largely hidden world; such immersion journalism is difficult to achieve but uniquely powerful to read. In addition to spending long periods with Kevin and Karen, Donaldson interviews policemen, judges, family members, and others in Kevin and Karen’s orbit, providing a remarkably panoramic account of their lives. Relationships between white women and black men have long been a hot issue in American culture. Even years after the 2008 presidential election, when society has in some ways seemingly moved on to a "postracial" perspective, people still have a lot to say about interracial relationships. Zebratown takes us into the heart of one and offers the paradoxical truth that while race is rarely not an issue in such relationships, in the end, what transpires between a couple is intensely individual. Meanwhile, the difficulty that ex-cons have successfully reentering society is an ongoing problem—for them, their families, and the communities where they live. Zebratown makes this struggle real, as Kevin Davis confronts not only his criminal record and his poor formal education but the cruelties of the postindustrial economy. Both his and Karen’s stories resonate powerfully with twenty-first-century American reality, and in telling them, Greg Donaldson confirms his position as one of the most intrepid journalists at work today.
La prison dans la ville

La prison dans la ville

Author: Martine HERZOG-EVANS
Publisher: Eres
ISBN: 2749232708
Pages: 136
Year: 2009-11-19T00:00:00+01:00
Des prisons sont implantées dans les villes. Invisibles pour leurs habitants, elles ont pourtant des effets significatifs au sein de celles-ci, sur la perception de la cité, du quartier, de ses habitants, sur certaines de ses activités, ses constructions, etc. Cet ouvrage, unique sur un tel sujet en France, a pour objet de décrire de manière pluridisciplinaire (un sociologue, une architecte, une juriste, mais aussi un ancien détenu) en quoi constitue cet impact. Scientifique, mais aussi plein d’anecdotes et de descriptions concrètes, cet ouvrage se lit facilement. Vous ne « verrez » plus « votre » prison comme avant. D’origine franco-britannique, Martine Herzog-Evans est professeur de droit à l’université de Reims.
The Mars Room

The Mars Room

Author: Rachel Kushner
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1476756600
Pages: 352
Year: 2018-05-01
NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER FINALIST for the MAN BOOKER PRIZE and LONGLISTED for the ANDREW CARNEGIE MEDAL “Gritty, empathetic, finely rendered, no sugary toppings, and a lot of punches, none of them pulled.” —Margaret Atwood via Twitter “A page turner… one of those books that enrage you even as they break your heart.” —The New York Times Book Review (cover review) “Brilliant and devastating… a heartbreaking, true, and nearly flawless novel.” —NPR “With her richly textured third novel, Kushner certifies her place as one of the great American novelists of the 21st century.” —Entertainment Weekly From twice National Book Award–nominated Rachel Kushner, whose Flamethrowers was called “the best, most brazen, most interesting book of the year” (Kathryn Schulz, New York magazine), comes a spectacularly compelling, heart-stopping novel about a life gone off the rails in contemporary America. It’s 2003 and Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility, deep in California’s Central Valley. Outside is the world from which she has been severed: the San Francisco of her youth and her young son, Jackson. Inside is a new reality: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive; the bluffing and pageantry and casual acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike; and the deadpan absurdities of institutional living, which Kushner evokes with great humor and precision. Stunning and unsentimental, The Mars Room demonstrates new levels of mastery and depth in Kushner’s work. It is audacious and tragic, propulsive and yet beautifully refined. As James Wood said in The New Yorker, her fiction “succeeds because it is so full of vibrantly different stories and histories, all of them particular, all of them brilliantly alive.”
Haunted by Atrocity

Haunted by Atrocity

Author: Benjamin G. Cloyd
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807137383
Pages: 280
Year: 2010-05-24
During the Civil War, approximately 56,000 Union and Confederate soldiers died in enemy military prison camps. Even in the midst of the war's shocking violence, the intensity of the prisoners' suffering and the brutal manner of their deaths provoked outrage, and both the Lincoln and Davis administrations manipulated the prison controversy to serve the exigencies of war. As both sides distributed propaganda designed to convince citizens of each section of the relative virtue of their own prison system -- in contrast to the cruel inhumanity of the opponent -- they etched hardened and divisive memories of the prison controversy into the American psyche, memories that would prove difficult to uproot. In Haunted by Atrocity, Benjamin G. Cloyd deftly analyzes how Americans have remembered the military prisons of the Civil War from the war itself to the present, making a strong case for the continued importance of the great conflict in contemporary America. Throughout Reconstruction and well into the twentieth century, Cloyd shows, competing sectional memories of the prisons prolonged the process of national reconciliation. Events such as the trial and execution of CSA Captain Henry Wirz -- commander of the notorious Andersonville prison -- along with political campaigns, the publication of prison memoirs, and even the construction of monuments to the prison dead all revived the painful accusations of deliberate cruelty. As northerners, white southerners, and African Americans contested the meaning of the war, these divisive memories tore at the scars of the conflict and ensured that the subject of Civil War prisons remained controversial. By the 1920s, the death of the Civil War generation removed much of the emotional connection to the war, and the devastation of the first two world wars provided new contexts in which to reassess the meaning of atrocity. As a result, Cloyd explains, a more objective opinion of Civil War prisons emerged -- one that condemned both the Union and the Confederacy for their callous handling of captives while it deemed the mistreatment of prisoners an inevitable consequence of modern war. But, Cloyd argues, these seductive arguments also deflected a closer examination of the precise responsibility for the tragedy of Civil War prisons and allowed Americans to believe in a comforting but ahistorical memory of the controversy. Both the recasting of the town of Andersonville as a Civil War village in the 1970s and the 1998 opening of the National Prisoner of War Museum at Andersonville National Historic Site reveal the continued American preference for myth over history -- a preference, Cloyd asserts, that inhibits a candid assessment of the evils committed during the Civil War. The first study of Civil War memory to focus exclusively on the military prison camps, Haunted by Atrocity offers a cautionary tale of how Americans, for generations, have unconsciously constructed their recollections of painful events in ways that protect cherished ideals of myth, meaning, identity, and, ultimately, a deeply rooted faith in American exceptionalism.
Arrest de la Cour du Parlement, concernant les prisons de la Ville de Paris

Arrest de la Cour du Parlement, concernant les prisons de la Ville de Paris

Author: Francia. Parlement de Paris
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 4
Year: 1733

Discipline & Punish

Discipline & Punish

Author: Michel Foucault
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307819299
Pages: 352
Year: 2012-04-18
In this brilliant work, the most influential philosopher since Sartre suggests that such vaunted reforms as the abolition of torture and the emergence of the modern penitentiary have merely shifted the focus of punishment from the prisoner's body to his soul.
The Ville

The Ville

Author: Greg Donaldson
Publisher: Fordham University Press
ISBN: 0823265684
Pages: 416
Year: 2015-05-01
In Brownsville's twenty-one housing projects, the young cops and the teenagers who stand solemnly on the street corners are bitter and familiar enemies. The Ville, as the Brownsville-East New York section of Brooklyn is called by the locals, is one of the most dangerous places on earth-a place where homicide is a daily occurence. Now, Greg Donaldson, a veteran urban reporter and a longtime teacher in Brooklyn's toughest schools, evokes this landscape with stunning and frightening accuracy. The Ville follows a year in the life of two urban black males from opposite sides of the street. Gary Lemite, an enthusiastic young Housing police officer, charges recklessly into gunfire in pursuit of respect and promotion. Sharron Corley, a member of a gang called the LoLifes and the star of the Thomas Jefferson High School play, is also looking for respect as he tries to survive these streets. Brilliantly capturing the firestorm of violence that is destroying a generation, waged by teenagers who know at thirty yards the difference between a MAC-10 machine pistol and a .357 Magnum, The Ville is the story of our inner cities and the lives of the young men who remain trapped there. In the tradition of There Are No Children Here, Clockers, and Random Family, The Ville is a vivid and unforgettable contribution to our understanding of race and violence in America today.
Enfants de la rue et de la prison dans une ville africaine (1975-1992)

Enfants de la rue et de la prison dans une ville africaine (1975-1992)

Author: Yves Balaam, Marie Thérèse Mengue
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 189
Year: 1997